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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Is Cupricide Australian Made?

  2. What are the dose rates?

  3. How much do I need to use?

  4. How does Cupricide work?

  5. How do I apply Cupricide?

  6. How long does it take before you start to see results?

  7. How should Cupricide be stored?

  8. Does Cupricide hurt livestock, birds and fish?

  9. I want to treat a dam which is used to fill troughs that cattle drink out of, what is the withholding period?

  10. Can Cupricide be used to kill aquatic weeds?

  11. Can Cupricide be used to treat algae on synthetic lawns including synthetic bowling greens?

  12. Can water dosed with Cupricide be used for irrigation of turf, race tracks, fairways and putting greens?

  13. Can algae present in water stored in a galvanized tank be treated with Cupricide?

  14. What is the shelf life of Cupricide?

  15. Copper Sulphate is cheap and does the job?

  16. Conversion Table


1. Is Cupricide Australian Made?

Yes, Cupricide is made in Australia by Agmin Chelates Pty Ltd which is located in Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

2. What are the dose rates?

There are three different dose rates for Cupricide 0.2 ppm Copper for very mild infestations, 0.5 ppm Copper for medium infestations and 1 ppm Copper for heavy infestations.

3. How much do I need to use?

Please read all directions on the label prior to use. In the case of filamentous and planktonic algae generally only the top 1 meter of water requires treatment, please refer to label for directions. In the case of shallow dams where the whole body of water may need to be treated, please refer to Newsletter 213 for details. For drip system applications in irrigation systems please refer to Newsletter 214 for details. For storage reservoirs greater than 100 ML please refer to Newsletter 219 for details.

4. How does Cupricide work?

Cupricide is a concentrated copper solution (110 g/L), however is diluted and used at dosages of 0.2 ppm 0.5 ppm or 1 ppm Copper. Even at these low concentrations Copper inhibits photosynthesis, thus the algae cells cannot function and will die within days.

5. How do I apply Cupricide?

Cupricide is most effective when it is applied in bright, early morning sunlight under calm conditions. Floating algae mats should be broken up either before spraying or during application. Product should be diluted 1:10 and sprayed evenly over the surface from boats, pontoons, aircraft or from the shore. Please refer to Newsletter 232 for more information on application techniques for large water storage reservoirs. Alternatively Cupricide may be dripped directly in flowing water (refer to Newsletter 214 for more information).

6. How long does it take before you start to see results?

Cupricide is preferentially taken up by algae within 3 hours and mortality is observed after 3-7 days.

7. How should Cupricide be stored?

Store Cupricide in its original, closed container, in a cool well ventilated area out of direct sunlight. Keep the concentrate away from foodstuffs, drinking containers and livestock.

8. Does Cupricide hurt livestock, birds and fish?

Cupricide is registered with the APVMA (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority) this means that before it was released for sale it was tested and assessed by a government body. So as long as Cupricide is used in accordance with label directions it will not harm livestock, humans, birds or fish. Decomposition of algae may deplete the dissolved oxygen levels in water which can suffocate fish, thus it may be better to treat 1/2 to 1/3 of the water body at a time, allowing oxygen levels to recover before treating with Cupricide again, (refer to product label for more information)

9. I want to treat a dam which is used to fill troughs that cattle drink out of, what is the withholding period?

The copper concentrations required to kill algae (0.2 ppm, 0.5 ppm or 0.1 ppm) are not injurious to humans or livestock. However certain algal species, especially blue-green algae will release powerful toxins from their cell contents as they breakdown. A typical withholding period in these cases is 7 days or in the case of heavy algal blooms 14 days, during which time the toxins will have been destroyed. For more information please refer to Newsletter No. 207.

10. Can Cupricide be used to kill aquatic weeds?

Field studies have shown that Cupricide is effective in killing the aquatic weeds Elodea, Hydrilla, Duck Weed, Curly Pond Weed and Ribbon Weed at a concentration of 1.0 ppm Copper when treating the whole body of water. Some species of fish are sensitive to copper levels and even this low level can be toxic to them (Refer to Newsletter No 210). Thus before treating aquatic weeds the flora and fauna must be considered and action should only be considered after a thorough risk assessment is conducted. Please refer to the product label for more details.

11. Can Cupricide be used to treat algae on synthetic lawns including synthetic bowling greens?

Yes, Cupricide is an effective algicide that can be used in many different applications. For an average synthetic bowling green (40m x 40m); 50 mL can be diluted in a minimum of 10L of water (enough to cover the surface) and sprayed evenly over the synthetic lawn (Refer to Newsletter 235).

12. Can water dosed with Cupricide be used for irrigation of turf, race tracks, fairways and putting greens?

Yes, may be used immediately after treatment; however it is best to wait 24 hours to allow Cupricide to begin working. Refer to Newsletter No 209 for further details.

13. Can algae present in water stored in a galvanized tank be treated with Cupricide?

Yes, as the Cupricide will be preferentially taken up by algae within the first three hours following application, it will not corrode the tank.

14. What is the shelf life of Cupricide?

2 years.

15. Copper Sulphate is cheap and does the job?

The copper in Cupricide is in a mixed alkanolamine complex, thus it can be used at lower dose rates than copper sulphate, is more stable in water and is better for the environment. A comprehensive discussion can be found in Newsletter No 206.

16. Conversion Table

1 ML = 1000 000 L
1 ha = 104 m2
1 ppm = 1 mg/L
1km2 = 1000 000 m2